Mission Hope Cancer Center
IThrivePlan

Chemotherapy Infusion Suite

chemotherapy infusion suite

As part of our commitment to comprehensive, convenient medical care at Mission Hope Cancer Center, we offer an on-site, state-of-the-art Oncology and Hematology Infusion Suite including two private rooms with electric beds for patients who need to lie down during their infusions. Our infusion suite cares for patients with cancer and other chronic conditions that require intravenous treatments and injections. Our dedicated team of highly-trained chemotherapy/infusion registered nurses and certified oncology nurses who work collaboratively with patients, families, physicians, and support staff to provide treatments and procedures in a caring, respectful, compassionate manner add an extra level of assurance and support during your treatment.

The suite has been uniquely designed to provide patients with an extra measure of privacy and comfort during their treatments. The new space offers infusion chairs equipped with individual electrical outlets and WiFi access during treatment. Additionally patients will be provided warm blankets from the blanket warmer to assist in the healing environment.

Preparing for Chemotherapy

Most new cancer patients are more frightened by the prospect of chemotherapy than by any other part of treatment. We have all seen movies or read books in which the hero was devastated by chemo. Now, however, most people go through months of chemotherapy without vomiting, and some are never nauseous. Even though a cancer patient is likely to feel relatively well most days, there will be some days when he/she may feel fatigued, distressed or unwell. Here are some strategies to prepare yourself or family member and your household for the months of chemotherapy ahead.

• Talk with your doctor about the specific chemo drugs being used and their side effects, which can vary enormously depending on the medication. Ask how the effects might managed.

• Hair loss is one of the most distressing side effects for many women. If you will be losing your hair, decide in advance when you want to cut it and how you want to cover your head. Have a wig, hats or scarves at home before you are likely to need them. Contact Jenni Davis (346.3402) for a free wig coupon and sign up for the Look Good, Feel Better Class (see page 13 for details).

• Consider treating yourself to a new set of soft sheets. Naps will be even nicer.

• Make sure to have a comfortable bathrobe or set of sweats to wear on the days you feel less well and need to rest.

• Schedule small rewards for yourself a day or two after each treatment.

• Buy a range of beverages. It will be important to drink a lot of fluids, and you will want a choice. Ginger, mint or chamomile teas may be soothing, whereas plain water may have a metallic taste (carbonated water mixed with a little juice may go down easier).

• Another good investment, if feasible: a tablet reader or electronic notepad such as a Kindle or an iPad. These are portable, light and easy to carry to appointments. If not, your chemo nurse at Mission Hope has an iPad available to use during treatment times; just ask.

• Talk with your doctor about the specific chemo drugs being used and their side effects, which can vary enormously depending on the medication. Ask how the effects might managed.

• Hair loss is one of the most distressing side effects for many women. If you will be losing your hair, decide in advance when you want to cut it and how you want to cover your head. Have a wig, hats or scarves at home before you are likely to need them. Contact Jenni Davis (346.3402) for a free wig coupon and sign up for the Look Good, Feel Better Class (see page 13 for details).

• Consider treating yourself to a new set of soft sheets. Naps will be even nicer.

• Make sure to have a comfortable bathrobe or set of sweats to wear on the days you feel less well and need to rest.

• Schedule small rewards for yourself a day or two after each treatment.

• Buy a range of beverages. It will be important to drink a lot of fluids, and you will want a choice. Ginger, mint or chamomile teas may be soothing, whereas plain water may have a metallic taste (carbonated water mixed with a little juice may go down easier).

• Another good investment, if feasible: a tablet reader or electronic notepad such as a Kindle or an iPad. These are portable, light and easy to carry to appointments. If not, your chemo nurse at Mission Hope has an iPad available to use during treatment times; just ask.